Compensation for Laser Eye Surgery Errors

Is it possible to claim compensation for laser eye surgery errors which caused me to partially lose vision in one eye?

It is possible to claim compensation for laser eye surgery errors in many instances, provided that an injury has been sustained or the patient has suffered a loss as a direct result of the treatment.

Laser surgery is a routine procedure which helps many thousands of sufferers of eye problems regain perfect vision every year in the UK; however mistakes can be made which can cause serious injuries to be sustained. When these errors could have been avoided, and an injury could have been prevented with proper care, it may be deemed to be medical negligence, and a claim for laser eye surgery errors compensation will be possible.

Claims for compensation for laser eye surgery errors due to medical negligence will only be successful if it can be established β€˜on the balance of probabilities’ that a surgeon has been incompetent or has not performed the operation with sufficient care. When it can be established – with the help of medical experts – that a competent eye surgeon should have completed the operation successfully or would have been able to prevent an injury being sustained, a laser eye surgery errors compensation claim is likely to be successful.

The most common reasons for making a claim for compensation for laser eye surgery errors due to medical negligence is when there has been a failure to diagnose a pre-existing eye problem such as glaucoma or retinal tears; both of which can cause serious problems for the patient and would disqualify a patient from receiving laser eye surgery. A failure to diagnose a medical condition which has resulted in an injury being sustained is another example of medical negligence, and when this happens, compensation for laser eye surgery errors can be claimed.

Laser eye surgery may be a generally safe treatment; however it is not without risk. It is because of these risks that laser eye surgery clinics require patients to sign a contract before an eye operation is conducted. This protects surgeons from compensation claims for eye surgery errors which can arise during and after the treatment. When the risks of the treatment have been explained to a patient and a contract has been signed, this may prevent any future claims for compensation for laser eye surgery errors from being made.

Regardless of whether compensation for laser eye surgery errors is being made for medical negligence or for an unsuccessful outcome which has left a patient with worse vision that before the operation, it is vital that a personal injury compensation solicitor is consulted for advice. Only after the circumstances of the operation and the nature of the injuries have been assessed can it be determined if a victim has a valid claim for compensation for laser eye surgery errors.