Woman to Claim for Medical Negligence Resulting in a Preventable Amputation

A woman is making a claim for medical negligence resulting in a preventable amputation after doctors allegedly misinterpreted the results of a CT scan.

The unnamed woman was admitted to hospital in January last year after fracturing her left femur. As she had a clinical history of underlying malignancy, she underwent a CT scan, X-rays and a blood test to determine whether her injury was due to a disease – such as osteoporosis – that led to a weakness of the bone structure.

The test results were interpreted as showing no signs of a disease. The woman subsequently underwent femoral nailing surgery – a procedure in which a metal rod is inserted into the cavity of the bone to strengthen it – and she was discharged soon after. However, a bone sample taken during the surgery revealed the presence of a cancerous tumour.

The woman was readmitted to hospital the following month to be treated for deep vein thrombosis – a common complication of femoral nailing surgery – and, on her discharge, found that her discharge notification included the results of the bone sample test. She complained that nobody had told her about the presence of a cancerous tumour, and the hospital conducted an investigation.

The diagnosis of cancer was not confirmed until one week later and, due to the treatment options being compromised by the femoral nailing surgery, she had to undergo an above the knee amputation to prevent the disease from spreading. The hospital explained the reason for the cancer not being identified on the CT scan as the scan not including the site in the thigh where the tumour was located.

After seeking legal advice, the woman has instructed solicitors to investigate the level of care she received in order to see if she can justifiably make a claim for medical negligence resulting in a preventable amputation against the Central Manchester University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Her solicitor believes her claim for medical negligence resulting in a preventable amputation believes she may have a strong case. He said:

“The swift, and more importantly, accurate diagnosis of cancer is absolutely crucial as early treatment can often provide the best possible chances of recovery and to prevent long-term health complications. Sadly, in this case, the NHS’ own investigation suggests that the staff who treated the woman at the NHS Trust in question failed to carry out the correct tests, meaning her cancer was not diagnosed as early as it could have been.”